Apr 112014
 

Over the past few articles we’ve looked at database joins. It started out with me noticing that joins appear to be getting bad press recently and wondering whether they really are the root of all evil that some people seem to think they are.

We seen that denormalizing removes joins, giving performance benefits to primary key lookups. This benefit can come at the cost of non-primary key lookup queries though – often the extra work for these “search” queries is outweights the gains made for the primary key lookups.

Query performance (particularly for “small” systems) is just part of the story though. The real cost of removing joins is the impact on data modification. Aside from (potentially) vastly increasing the number of records must update to keep data consistent, denormalization can introduce waiting issues for concurrent updates. In the worst case we may introduce application bugs in the form of deadlocks.

We’ve seen there are some cases where joins do result in inefficient queries. These are usually the result of poor design decisions or limitations of the optimizer. Better design and use of Oracle features can overcome the worst of many of these however.

I hope you’ve found this series (and blog as a whole!) useful and informative. If there’s anything else you’d like to see on the subject of joins get in touch or say in the comments.

I’m going to take a break from regular blogging for a while to work on other projects. Thanks to those of you who’ve been following. If you’d like to receive posts when I start again, just enter your email address in the form below!

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>